Interview Follow Up

 Thank you notes

 Negotiating offers


Thank you notes

After every interview (whether for an actual position or for information only) a thank you letter or emails must be sent. Even if you did not enjoy the interview (or the interviewer), and/or you are not interested in the position, it is important to thank the interviewer for the time s/he spent with you. You never know if, five years from now, that person will be in a position to hire you for a job you would really like.

Content

Address the letter to the person who initially invited you for the interview. If you saw more than one person, you can write to each of them, or refer to them in your letter to the primary interviewer. Mention the title of the position for which you interviewed.

  • Send a thank-you letter or email within 24 hours after every interview, whether it was an informational meeting or a job interview. When you know a hiring decision will be made quickly, an e-mail note is appropriate.
  • Following a job interview, address the letter to the person who initially invited you for the interview (usually the person with the authority to hire you).
  • If your interview was arranged by a human resources representative, it is appropriate to write both to that person and to the hiring manager.
  • However, it is not necessary or desirable to write to everyone you saw in the course of a visit. You can ask the one or two to whom you write to thank the others on your behalf.
  • In your letter, mention the title of the position for which you interviewed.
  • If you are interested in the position, express your enthusiasm and reiterate your desire for the job and your qualifications for it. Also, express your appreciation for the interview and the date (specifically or generally) that you expect to hear from the interviewer.
  • If you are not interested, you can still express appreciation for the consideration extended to you during the interview, as well as tactfully indicate that at this point you are no longer interested in being considered for the position.

For additional information, please see our "Follow Up Correspondence" page.


Negotiating offers

After several successful rounds of interviewing for a job, you will eventually be offered the position. Once a formal offer letter (or perhaps email) has been received, you can begin the process of negotiation. Ideally, you should wait to receive a written offer before negotiating. A verbal offer over the phone is not yet a formalized offer. In some cases, employers may start a type of negotiating during the final round of interviewing itself, by asking you what salary you might hope to expect if offered the position. It helps to be prepared for these types of questions, and to try to delay actual negotiating until you have been offered the position - this is when you are in the strongest position to negotiate for the key priorities that will make your new position the best fit for you and for your future career path.

For more information on researching salaries and negotiating offers, CLICK HERE