Follow Up Correspondence

Thank You Letters
Acceptance Letters
Declining Letters


Thank You Notes

After every interview - phone, video, informational, on-site and/or final round - it is appropriate to send a thank-you note. Even if the interview (or the interviewer) wasn't your favorite or you are no longer interested in the position, it is important to say thank you for the time he or she spent with you. (You never know if, five years from now, that person will be in a position to hire you.) It is not necessary for the letter to be long and elaborate.

  • Send a thank-you letter within 24 hours after every interview; by email is perfectly acceptable, whereas a hand-written note, if time allows, can demonstrate traditional professionalism (it really depends on your recipient and the culture of their industry). 
  • Address your note to the person who initially invited you for the interview (usually the person with the authority to hire you).  If your interview was arranged by a human resources representative or recruiter, but took place with a hiring manager or another person, it is appropriate to write both to the person who made the arrangements as well as the person who conducted the interview.  If your interview involved talking with or meeting multiple people, it is not necessary or desirable to write to everyone you met; request that the recipient of your note thank the others involved on your behalf. 

Points to Make

  • Express your continuing interest in the position.
  • Refer directly to what you learned in the interview in relation to your understanding of the job or your confidence in your ability to perform it.
  • Thank the interviewer for the time, information, and consideration which he or she gave you.
  • Be succinct. The interview itself was your opportunity to impress the employer. The thank-you note is an opportunity to show that you listened to what he or she had to say in the interview.
  • Here's an example:

    West 99th Street
    Dallas, TX 99999

    September 9 , 2017

    Ms. Jane Doe
    Director of Human Resources
    ABC Hospital
    Dallas, TX 99999

    Dear Ms. Doe:

    I sincerely enjoyed meeting with you yesterday and learning more about possible accounting positions at ABC Hospital. Our conversation confirmed my interest in becoming part of ABC's staff. I was particularly excited by the idea of working as part of a strategic planning team in your internal accounting department and feel confident that my past experience both in auditing and accounting in hospital settings would enable me to fill your needs effectively.

    Please contact me if I can provide you with any further information. As we discussed, I look forward to hearing from you by the end of September. Thank you again for the courtesy that you extended to me.

    Sincerely,

    Susan Gallagher

    Susan Gallagher

If You Are Not Interested in the Position

  • Write a thank-you letter anyway. Express appreciation for the interviewer's time and attention to you.
  • If you don't wish to be considered further for the position, say so. It is not necessary to elaborate on why not. The tone of this letter should be entirely positive.
  • Here's an example:

14 Elm Street
Chicago, IL 99999

April 17, 2017

Mr. Stephen Briar
Director of Sales
Yardell Corporation
Chicago, IL 99999

Dear Mr. Briar:

Thank you for taking the time to arrange my visit to Yardell Corporation. I appreciated the opportunity to learn more about the sales position with the firm and enjoyed meeting Tom Fries, Jordan Smith, and Sally Hemingway. All three were extremely generous with their time and helped me to become more familiar with the responsibilities of an account executive.

Although I enjoyed my visit, at this point I have decided to focus my job search on positions that are less commission-based and require less travel and therefore withdraw my candidacy.  I wish you the best of luck with the search.

Sincerely,

Susan Gallagher

Susan Gallagher


Offer Acceptance Letter

  • Always confirm a job acceptance in writing. Restate the significant terms of the offer and reaffirm your enthusiasm for the position.
  • Here's an example:

    4600 Pine Street
    Philadelphia, PA 19143

    May 3, 2018

    Ms. Jane Doe
    Manager of College Relations
    Big Bank
    100 First Street
    New York, NY 10001

    Dear Ms. Doe:

    I am happy to accept your offer of a position as a Systems Analyst at an annual salary of $75,000 with a $3,000 signing bonus. Big Bank's state-of-the-art technology and professional systems staff are impressive, and I look forward to working with everyone I met during my visit.

    As we discussed, I'll begin work on August 1. Thank you for everything you did to make interviewing informative and pleasant.

    Sincerely,

    Joseph Mallory


Offer Decline Letter

  • When you write to decline the offer of a position, it is your choice whether or not to give any detail about what you will be doing instead. Anything from "I have decided to decline your offer," to "I have accepted an offer from X, and therefore need to decline your offer" is fine. However, it's best not to mention a specific alternative which contradicts the career goals you described in your interview. Make sure you say something positive about the organization you're turning down and express appreciation for the time people there spent speaking with you.
  • Here's an example:

4107 Spruce St.
Philadelphia, PA 19104

March 15, 2018

Ms. Jane Doe
Manager of College Relations
Niche Consulting Firm
101 E. Power Ave.
New York, NY 10001

Dear Ms. Doe:

After much consideration, I have decided to decline your attractive offer in order to accept a position with another employer. What made this decision particularly difficult was the nature of your client base and the quality of the training you were prepared to offer me. In every conversation with members of your firm, I was impressed by your collective commitment to quality. I appreciated the time you all spent with me and hope that our paths will cross again.

Sincerely,

John Granfeld